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Poaching - General

What is poaching?

 

Poaching is the illegal taking of wild plants or animals contrary to local and international conservation and wildlife management laws. Violations of hunting laws and regulations are normally punishable by law and, collectively, such violations are known as poaching. (Wikipedia) 

 

 

Different types of poaching  

 

  • Poaching with snares:

                                                                                                                                     

 The snares are mainly made of wire and tied to branches. A loop of the wire is positioned in such a way that if the animal walks on the game path, it will get its head caught in the loop, which tightens as it is pulled.giraffe snare

The poacher set snares at different levels sizes depending on the animal’s size and species which he wishes to catch.

Wildbeest snared            Impala snared

 However, when the snare is old or has fallen to the ground, it lies on the game path and can snare anything from as small as a Steenbok to an animal as large as a giraffe. Even our primary predators such as lions, hyenas... get caught!

                               Hyena snared   Lion snared

 

  • Poaching with dogs:

 

 

poacher dogThis form of poaching is a successful method, and very difficult to monitor. Those very experienced poachers tend to make use of the full moon to infiltrate farms whilst hunting with dogs. The poachers’ dogs are very well trained, moving silently and obediently through the bush. Poachers often walk with two sticks, tapping them in various ways to give orders to the dogs.

 

The game caught is mainly warthogs. The poachers often build fires in the entrance to the warthog holes to smoke the animals out and then the dogs are trained to bring the warthog to the ground.      

                               warthog hole   warthog poached by dogs

During winter, the dogs are also used to chase bigger game (such as kudus, wildebeests...) until exhaustion. The game is weaker during this time because of the poor nutrient quality of the grass.

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